Top Questions to Ask Your Contractor

You need to make sure that any contractor you do business with has proven themselves in the past, and will be there if you need them in the future. Don’t just ASK the contractor if they are stable; look for tangible proof of longevity and financial stability by asking these questions below.

How long have you been in the business or working in the industry?
Look for a credible track record and successful work experience.

Are you licensed, insured and bonded?
At the very least, make sure your pro is licensed and carries worker’s comp and liability insurance. Bonding is not a universal requirement. Think of bonding as homeowner insurance that protects you in case of an incomplete job.

Do you guarantee your work in writing?
While a verbal guarantee is nice, it offers no guarantees that the contractor will actually stand behind his work. Draft a written guarantee that states exactly what is and isn’t covered.

Can you provide references?
Ratings and reviews are a great resource, especially when coupled with references from previous customers. Ask your contractor to provide a list of references. Don’t hire pros who can’t offer references.

Do you pull all the required permits?
Failing to pull the requited permits can cost you big time. Have your contractor pull the necessary paperwork and permits to get your job started. If your contractor is hesitant, find a new pro.

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Who will be managing the project?
If your contractor isn’t in charge of your job, insist on meeting the project manager to ensure he measures up to your standards.

What is the project timeline and daily work schedule?
Construction scheduling is never perfect. Workers get sick, orders get delayed and weather causes interruptions. But an organized contractor will provide you with a work schedule that clearly outlines a start and end date.

Will you sign a contract?
All worthwhile contractors will write out a clear contract that defines the work to be performed, as well as the material, costs and completion timeframes associated with the project. Thorough contracts also cover what happens if the project becomes problematic. This is known as a time and materials contract. The contract should also include a termination clause that spells out the circumstances in which both parties are allowed to terminate the contract.

Information has been taken from HomeAdvisor

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